Author Topic: Questions Part 50 (part b)  (Read 2132 times)

admin

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Questions Part 50 (part b)
« on: August 30, 2009, 04:32:29 PM »
jeff



Joined: 02 Feb 2004
Posts: 2

   
PostPosted: Wed Feb 18, 2004 5:58 am    Post subject: final dialysate    

What does the term final dialysate mean?<
><
>Is there anyplace on the net that has dialysis terms? Or a book?

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Founding RN



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 172

   
PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2004 10:29 am    Post subject: Jeff    

This is a term that I have not heard of before. I do know that terms differ all across the country. Most terms are medical and you can find most of them in a glossery of medical terminology. Some basic dialysis terms are found in the glossery of "Review of Hemodialysis for Nurses and Dialysis Personnel". Yahoo is a pretty good place to find sites with medical terminology.

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Dialysisalternative



Joined: 18 Mar 2004
Posts: 1

   
PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 8:00 am    Post subject: Beer    

astynorm<
>Unregistered User<
>(3/17/04 12:15 pm)<
>152.163.253.2<
>Reply | Edit | Del All --------------------------------------------------------------------------------<
> Is there any beer that is lower in phosphorus?

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Founding RN



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 172

   
PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2004 8:04 am    Post subject: Beer    

That is a question for your dietician. I would think not, but check with them.

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Dan



Joined: 14 Jun 2005
Posts: 3

   
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 6:03 am    Post subject: Can dialysis fail?    

Dan<
>Unregistered User<
>(8/2/05 6:47 pm)<
>Reply Can dialysis fail ???<
>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<
> I'm writing a story with kidney failure as a major plotline. My problem: a donor is giving a kidney to a relative to save her life.<
><
>Are there cases where dialysis doesn't work or the candidate cannot use dialysis?

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Founding RN



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 172

   
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2005 6:10 am    Post subject: Dialysis Failure    

Dialysis works no matter what. But it is the patient who eventially fails. Problems that occur are that the patient runs out of options for an access or can not tolerate any longer the dialysis process due to organ / multiple organ failure, infection that the patient can no longer fight off, or any multitude of other health problems. Many patients find that the process becomes too painful and opt to go on comfort care. Transplants are only a stop gap. They are not the cure. Transplants will fail in the majority of cases, how soon depends on the match up of the kidney and how well the patient takes care of themselves, and the cause of the kidney failure in the first place. This is only the tip of the iceburg.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:49 pm    Post subject: Prognosis    

mecca3



Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 1

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2005 1:25 pm Post subject: Prognosis for geriatric hemodialysis patient?

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My father-in-law is 83 and has been hemodialzed for the last 28 months.He has had 2 catheter ablations during that time, and last week had an ICD installed. He is now in rehab, and though he had lived alone, his daughters are not optimistic he will be able to return home; he is just too weak and immobile.

As his health care proxies, they will be responsible for making medical decisions on his behalf should he become unable to do so. No one has a crystal ball, but here is what they've gathered so far:

The 2 year survival mean for a geriatric hemodialysis patient is 28 months.

The 5 year survival rate for patients aged 70-75 beginning hemodialysis is 4%.

If correct, these figures bolster their layman's observed opinion that their father may have begun a downward spiral from which he is not likely to recover from.

Are these figures correct?

What is the "likely" progression towards end-of-life that these comorbid conditions indicate?

Thanks

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DE Founding RN
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:59 pm    Post subject: Prognosis    

I wish I had better news for you, but it does not sound like your father will do much better. He certainly will not be able to live on his own again. Dialysis wipes a person out and at his age, your father would be better off with someone who can look in on him and attend to his needs as he needs assistance.

If it is possible for him to have home dialysis and to do it daily for 2-3 hours, then he has a better chance of doing better. But if he is tied to the outpatient, 3 times a week deal then I fear this may be the begining of a slow decline.

What all of you need to do right now is sit down with your father and talk over his wishes. He needs to let you know now what his advanced directives will be and you all need to be in agreement. There is nothing more heart breaking than for me to witness a patient who is continuing on dialysis but wants deperately to stop, but can not speak any longer for themselves, and their family is unwilling to honor the patients final wishes.
"Like me, you could.....be unfortunate enough to stumble upon a silent war. The trouble is that once you see it, you can't unsee it. And once you've seen it, keeping quiet, saying nothing,becomes as political an act as speaking out. Either way, you're accountable."

Arundhati Roy